China’s revised law on religion threat to survival of Buddhism: Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights
[Saturday, March 03, 2018 18:02]
By Tenzin Monlam

DHARAMSHALA, March 3: Warsaw-based human rights group at the ongoing 37th Regular Session of the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC) in Geneva yesterday expressed its grave concern regarding the adverse impact of China’s revised regulation on Buddhism in Tibet.

Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights (HFHR) in its statement addressed to the President of UN’s Human Rights Council informed that the revised law, in effect since February 2, strengthens Communist Party’s far-reaching power over people’s lives and beliefs and further threatens Tibetan Buddhism’s continued survival under Chinese rule.

“While they intend to regulate almost every aspect of religious life, in addition, the revised rules conflate peaceful religious practice with ‘threats’ to China’s security, creating a more dangerous political environment for monks, nuns, and lay Buddhists,” the rights group said in its statement dated March 2, 2018.

Kai Müller, Executive Director of International Campaign for Tibet (Germany) at the UNHRC on behalf of the rights group, thanked the Special Rapporteur for his report and commended the Special Rapporteur and team for the work undertaken for the protection of religious freedom or belief.

“We are concerned that despite many concerns raised by the international community, also in this body, the situation at Larung Gar and Yarchen Gar remains unsatisfactory and deeply worrisome, as massive state intervention at these sites continues to violate the freedom of religion of Buddhist practitioners,” the statement said.

The rights group requested all the members of the UNHRC to urge ‘the Chinese government to respect internationally accepted standards of freedom of religion or belief’.

Müller asked the members of the council to bring Chinese law at par with the international law and refrain from ‘intervening with religious activities that are protected by principles of freedom of religion or belief.’




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