Book on exile community’s problems and prospects released
[Thursday, November 03, 2016 23:47]
By Tenzin Dharpo

L to R- Author Tsewang Rigzin, Tibet Policy Institute Chief Thupten Samphel and LTWA Director Ven. Geshe Lakhdor at the book launch in Dharamshala. Nov. 3, 2016
L to R- Author Tsewang Rigzin, Tibet Policy Institute Chief Thupten Samphel and LTWA Director Ven. Geshe Lakhdor at the book launch in Dharamshala. Nov. 3, 2016
DHARAMSHALA, Nov. 3: A book documenting the research of the Tibetan diaspora in exile, ‘The Exile Tibetan Community: Problems and Prospects’ was released today by the Library of Tibetan Works and archives here.

A refreshing approach to the existing Tibetan community and with a clear sight into the future, the book aptly assembles the entirety of the Tibetan community into a three dimensional construct; Central Tibetan Administration: The institution, Settlements: The people and the Educational Centers: The Future.

Along with a varied and informative statistical diagrams and charts that denote a figurative narration on the problems that persists in the community, the reference and prediction to the probability of future crisis that may lay in wait for the Tibetan community is refreshing.

Author Tsewang Rigzin who works as a consultant for Tibet Fund says that the keeping an eye out for the future is what makes us prepared and thrive in the coming times. His research delves and charts out recommendation of approaches and strategies to “mitigate the anticipated risks” thereby contributing to a “vibrant and self-sustaining” Tibetan community.

Speaking to Phayul, he said, “Even though it is difficult for me to say it, in the next 30 years, a scenario will take place where His Holiness will not be among us. That is a fact. Right now, the dependency we have on this extremely wise leader is too high. If we are not prepared during that time when he is no longer with us, it is going to be a very disastrous period in the history of Tibet.”

LTWA facilitated the printing of the booklet. It’s Director, Ven. Geshe Lakhdor said, “There is clearly a danger in the future of the Tibetan people in exile to develop complacency and for the struggle for the cause of Tibet to disappear. This book is sincere in its approach to point to the pitfalls leading to such crisis.”

Tibet Policy Institute’s Chief Thupten Samphel who mentored the author while writing the book also expressed similar views. In reference to a particular subject from the book, he said, “The fertility rate of the exile Tibetan community is alarming considering that in between 1989 and 2009, the replacement fertility rate has dropped by 3.72 points. For a small community like ours, such development can prove detrimental in the future.”

Over a year in research and in writing the book, Tsewang said the journey to write this book has taken him places and that he had the opportunity to speak right from the Tibetan Prime Minister to many young children in the exile community.

According to CTA’s Planning Commission who conducted a demographic survey in 2009, there are over 1,28,000 Tibetans living in exile, all over the world.


http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=38228&t=0