Tibetan singer ‘temporarily’ ends coffin march in Geneva, Sings in front of UN office
Phayul[Wednesday, July 11, 2012 16:27]
Tibetan singer Loten Namling arriving at the Place des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland on June 8, 2012 after dragging the coffin symbolic of Tibet's slow death for more than 50 days from Bern.
Tibetan singer Loten Namling arriving at the Place des Nations in Geneva, Switzerland on June 8, 2012 after dragging the coffin symbolic of Tibet's slow death for more than 50 days from Bern.
DHARAMSHALA, July 11: After marching on the road for almost 50 days, renowned Tibetan singer Loten Namling “temporarily” ended his coffin march with a ‘Free Tibet’ concert in front of the United Nations office in Geneva on Sunday.

The Swiss-based Tibetan singer began his ‘Journey for Freedom – One Man, One Path, Free Tibet,’ on May 16 from the capital Bern.

Arriving at Geneva, dragging the coffin symbolic of Tibet’s slow death, Namling declared that his journey has not come to an end.

“I will strengthen the Journey for Freedom until the cry for Freedom of my brothers and sisters is heard all over the world and their two wishes, Freedom and the Return of the Dalai Lama, are fulfilled,” Namling said.

The singer also thanked everyone associated with his march for their support.

Around 15 artists, including the legendary Young Gods’ singer Franz Treichler sang at the ‘Free Tibet’ concert.

Hundreds of Tibetans and supporters, including the former Envoy of the Dalai Lama, Kelsang Gyaltsen were present.

Since Namling began his coffin march, aimed at drawing international attention to the ongoing crisis inside Tibet, eight more Tibetans have set themselves on fire protesting China’s continued occupation of Tibet.

Loten Namling performing at the 'Free Tibet' concert along with the legendary band 'The Young Gods' on June 8, 2012 at the Place des Nations in Geneva.
Loten Namling performing at the 'Free Tibet' concert along with the legendary band 'The Young Gods' on June 8, 2012 at the Place des Nations in Geneva.
Throughout his march, the musician, in regular intervals offered prostrations to honor the memory of Tibetan martyrs, met people, held concerts, and spoke about the critical situation inside Tibet.

Loten had set out five goals for his coffin march, which included an urgent appeal to the UN to send a fact-finding delegation to Tibet and a plea to Switzerland, his exile home for the past 22 years, to initiate a dialogue between “the representatives of the Tibetan Exile Government and the Chinese.”

"Switzerland has a good reputation in world politics as a stable, peace-loving democracy,” Namling, who has popular albums such as ‘White Crane’ and ‘Songs of Tibet’ to his credit had said. “If direct talks take place here, they are certain to be taken seriously."

Loten Namling has traveled worldwide and performed in over 200 shows with his Tibetan lute, singing authentic traditional Tibetan songs and telling stories about his life-connecting the songs of the past to the reality of the present and inviting his audience on a musical journey through the landscape of Tibetan spirituality.

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