Exiled Lama seeks explanation about Chinese clampdown on his monastery
Phayul[Tuesday, March 24, 2009 19:56]
By Kalsang Rinchen

Shingsa Rinpoche sits on his throne at Sera monastery in Bylakupee, south India
Shingsa Rinpoche sits on his throne at Sera monastery in Bylakupee, south India
Dharamsala, March 24 – An exiled Tibetan Lama has expressed his disappointment over what he calls “immeasurable sufferings” inflicted on the monks of his Monastery by the Chinese Army.

Shingsa Trulku Choeki Gyaltsen, revered as the 11th reincarnation of the Great Mother of Je Tsongkhapa; the founder of the Gelugpa School of Tibetan Buddhism, is the principal Lama of Ragya monastery which recently reeled under tension after a monk of his monastery in Tibet jumped into Machu river killing himself.

In a letter to the government of the People’s Republic of China, he condemned “religious persecution” in Tibet and demanded explanation from the Chinese government about the death of his follower Tashi Sangpo and current status of Tapey, a monk of Kirti monastery who set himself ablaze on February 27, 2009.

He wrote that the Central Government of China, Provincial Governments and the Local Administrations should bear complete responsibility of the ongoing unrest in Tibet and the crackdown last year, saying that they must resolve issues peacefully.

Accusing the Chinese government of desecrating his monastery with guns and military forces, the 28 year old Tibetan Lama demanded that the government must withdraw troops from his monastery.

Like the Dalai Lama, Shingsa Rinpoche fled from the Chinese occupation in 1997 after which his seat monastery and followers has been devoid of his presence and blessings. The young Lama now lives in Sera monastery in south India.

A strong supporter of Tibetan independence, a position that is not supported by the Dalai Lama who seeks genuine autonomy for Tibet, Shingsa Rinpoche took part in the ‘march to Tibet’ last year carried out by 5 Tibetan NGOs.

Tenzin Tsundue, a writer and independence activist who took part in the march, told phayul that Rinpoche was a great source of inspiration for other marchers.

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