Police arrest 80 Tibetan protesters in Kathmandu
whatabouttibet.com[Sunday, August 03, 2008 15:45]
By Luke Ward

(Photo by Luke Ward)
(Photo by Luke Ward)
Kathmandu, August 2 - With less than a week before the Beijing Olympics, Tibetans in Nepal once again attempted to march into the Chinese consulate, nearby the former King's palace. However, following yesterday's protest in which the thuggish Nepalese police initially struggled to cope with the large numbers of protesters, they took no such risks today, flooding the area with police. The vast majority being monks and nuns, the Tibetan demonstrators were soon being dragged into waiting trucks and vans, grouping together to make it harder for the police to isolate individuals.In all over 80- individuals were arrested, with three injuries.

As the Nepalese government tries to self-organise following 'democratic' elections earlier this year, the situation for Tibetans in Nepal seems to be worsening. Unable to legally protest, and receiving often brutal treatment for doing so, the Chinese government seems to play an ever-increasing role in Nepalese politics. Using aid as an incentive for the Nepalese government, Beijing has been able to order successive Nepalese leaders to maintain its 'One China' policy, despite a rich shared history and culture between the people of Nepal and Tibet. Large numbers of spies are known to be living at Tibetan settlements around Kathmandu, working for the Chinese government.
(Photo by Luke Ward)
(Photo by Luke Ward)
Additionally, Tibetan refugees are unable to get jobs in any government positions, including government schools etc. Dolma, a Tibetan born in Nepal describes the situation as 'desperate' saying that after the Nepali government stopped accepting Tibetan refugees in 1990, those without Nepalese citizenship, and especially those without an RC face many problems.'

In 2006, there was much talk of the USA wishing to accept 5,000 Tibetans without documentation from Nepal, however, this was blocked by the Nepalese government. 'All of the Tibetans here want to go to the West, to get good jobs and such, but the Nepalese government won't even allow that, because of Chinese pressure,' Dolma continued, Nepal's policy to it's Tibetan guests is muddled and unclear.
(Photo by Luke Ward)
(Photo by Luke Ward)
Despite the Tibetan carpets for years being Nepal's main export, and contintuing to play an important role in the economy, Tibetans are now treated like an unwanted irritation. However, with the Beijing Olympics approaching, it is guaranteed that Tibetans in Nepal will continue to protest against Chinese rule, along with Tibetans and supporters worldwide.

http://www.phayul.com/news/article.aspx?id=22208&t=0