Hi guest, Register | Login | Contact Us
Welcome to Phayul.com - Our News Your Views
Mon 22, Jul 2019 09:36 PM (IST)
Search:     powered by Google
 MENU
Home
News
Photo News
Opinions
Statements &
Press Releases

Book Reviews
Movie Reviews
Interviews
Travels
Health
Obituaries
News Discussions
News Archives
Download photos from Tibet
 Latest Stories
Tibetan leadership offers condolences over the demise of former Delhi CM Sheila Dikshit
Brawl among Tibetan youths in Belgium leaves 4 injured, Police begin probe
Only Dalai Lama has the right over his reincarnation, Chinese statement politically motivated: Dalai Lama's office
Dalai Lama greets the first woman president of the European Commission
His Holiness’ message of religious harmony is doing magic in Ladakh: Sonam Wangchuk
Niece of slain Tibetan religious leader urges Trump to support Tibet, Dalai Lama’s return
Speaker Pelosi condemns Xi Jinping for persecuting people for their faith
Compassion is indispensable for a good doctor: Dalai Lama
Drones, check points and travel restriction at Yachen Gar
India must recognize Beijing’s Dalai Lama or risk ‘major political difference’: Chinese official
Advertisement
Readers' Comments on "We Are Not Seeking Independence: His Holiness"
"We are not seeking independence. We are seeking genuine autonomy within the constitutional framework of the People's Republic of China," His Holiness the Dalai Lama reiterated in his...
 Click here to post your comment
46 comment(s) found You are on page 1 of 5
Name
Comment
Bhod Rangzen  

Location: Delhi
Subject: pLEASE READ THIS ARTICLE
Nov 28 2005 02:41 PM

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/10/19/AR2005101902310.html
Bhod Rangzen  

Location: Delhi
Subject: Hu, Wen & Hou
Nov 28 2005 01:42 PM

Oh and I forgot to bring to your kind notice that your own country PRC was not recognized until 1971 by the UN and that until then Taiwan was recognized China.

Seems you commies are amnesiac.
Bhod Rangzen  

Location: Delhi
Subject: "Chew & Lie"
Nov 28 2005 01:25 PM

Dear 123,

Now you have made a person who has visited my country and written a book about it Tibetologist. I have been to China, Austyarlia and many other countries. Am I also an expert on all these countries.

I went to the website you suggested and here is what I read, 'Rockhill's name, once almost forgotten except in connection with the formulation of the historic 'Open Door Policy' for China, comes up for reasons closer to his own heart. Rockhill was the first American to learn to read, write and speak Tibetan fluently, and one of the first Westerners to be hosted by the Dalai Lama, conversing with the spiritual leader directly in his own language'.

This does not imply in any stage that he is a Tibetologist or any authority on Tibet. It is clear that he is not an important person as his name is implied to be 'forgotten'. Who are forgotten usually? The answer is people of no particular consequence.

If anyone is an authority on Tibet and with more right to speak on Tibet, it is none other than Dalai Lama himself who is the king and sovereign. And he himself says that Tibet was a free country. So what you are trying to me is that a person who was a friend of Dalai Lama should be believed more than Dalai Lama himself? What kind of mad Mandrin logic is that? My parents and six million Tibetans who lived in Tibet all of their life know more about Tibet than an American Diplomat.

Xinjiang is referred to by all as East Turkistan. If you don't believe it, read books which are probably banned by your government, then you'd know. As for Ottoman Empire, I acknowledge that although they were not part of the Ottoman Empire, they definitely are of Turkish descent and not Chinese, just as we Tibetans and Mongolians are not Chinese. So the basis of my argument still stands.

Ok not more than half but definitely half are appointed stooges of China, so what democracy is it? Half-baked? I told you about the US Congress Bill and those various other International Bodies which have passed about Tibet. Obviously you haven't read them.

Since I know that sites are blocked in your country I attach here for your benefit some quotes.

United Nations General Assembly - Resolution 1723 (XVI)

New York, 1961
The General Assembly,
Recalling its resolution 1353 (XIV) of 21 October 1959 on the question of Tibet,
Gravely concerned at the continuation of events in Tibet, including the violation of the fundamental human rights of the Tibetan people and the suppression of the distinctive cultural and religious life which they have traditionally enjoyed,
Noting with deep anxiety the severe hardships which these events have inflicted on the Tibetan people, as evidenced by the large-scale exodus of Tibetan refugees to the neighboring countries,
Considering that these events violate fundamental human rights and freedoms set out in the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, including the principle of self-determination of peoples and nations, and have the deplorable effect of increasing international tension and embittering relations between peoples,
1) Reaffirms its conviction that respect for the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is essential for the evolution of a peaceful world order based on the rule of law;
2) Solemnly renews its call for the cessation of practices which deprive the Tibetan people of their fundamental human rights and freedoms, including their right to self-determination;
3) Expresses the hope that Member States will make all possible efforts, as appropriate, towards achieving the purposes of the present resolution
ICJ Report on Tibet 1959


International Commission of Jurists Report on:
The Question of Tibet
The rule of Law
Geneva, 1959
(EXCERPT)

Introduction to the evidence on Chinese activities in Tibet
The allegations against the People's Republic of China can be fitted into three broad legal categories:

1) Systematic disregard for the obligations under the Seventeen-Point Agreement of 1951;

2) Systematic violation of the fundamental rights and freedoms of the people of Tibet;

3) Wanton killing of Tibetans and other acts capable of leading to the extinction of the Tibetans as a national and religious group, to the extent that it becomes necessary to consider the question of Genocide.

There is some inevitable overlap between these categories, for example, in the case of respect for religious belief, where there is this obligation under the Seventeen-Point Agreement [Article 7] and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights [Article 18].

The significance of these three legal categories may be briefly explained. Violation of the 1951 Agreement by China can be regarded as a release of the Tibetan Government from its obligations, with the result that Tibet regained the sovereignty which she surrendered under the Agreement. This question is discussed in the part of this report entitled "The Position of Tibet in International Law." For this reason the violations of the Agreement by China amount to more than a matter of domestic concern between Tibet and China.

What is at stake is the very existence of Tibet as a member of the family of nations, and this matter concerns the whole family of nations. Evidence showing the systematic violation by China of the obligations under the Agreement is therefore printed in extenso.

Any systematic violation of human rights in any part of the world should, it is submitted, be a matter for discussion by the United Nations. For this reason the evidence which indicates violation on a systematic scale of the rights of the Tibetan people as human beings is printed in extenso. Most people will agree that in the sphere of human rights, some rights are fundamental. The rights of the Tibetans which appear to have been ruthlessly violated are of the most fundamental - even that of life itself. With violations of this gravity it is not a question of human rights being modified to meet the requirements of local conditions. It is a question of conduct which shocks the civilized world and does not even need to be fitted into a legal category. The evidence points to a systematic design to eradicate the separate national, cultural and religious life of Tibet.

Genocide is the gravest crime known to the law of nations. No allegation of Genocide should be made without the most careful consideration of evidence that killings, or other acts prohibited by the Genocide Convention, however extensive, are directed towards the destruction in whole or in part of a particular group which constitutes a race, a nation or a religion. The facts, as far as they are known are set out in extenso. It is submitted, with a full appreciation of the gravity of this accusation, that the evidence points at least to a prima facie case of Genocide against the People's Republic of China. This case merits full investigation by the United Nations.

The evidence submitted against China is printed verbatim in this report. Statements made by the official press and radio of the Chinese People's Republic are reproduced at perhaps inordinate length, and even so amount to no more than specimens of the Chinese account of the recent history of Tibet. Space does not permit a fuller inclusion, but it is considered that the selection is at least typical of the official Chinese accounts. The accounts given by Tibetan leaders in exile and refugees on the one hand, and Chinese spokesmen and

Tibetan collaborators on the other are reproduced with a minimum of editing and running commentary. By and large the accounts given by Tibetans are self-evidently linked to the specific legal category under which they are cited; accounts from Chinese sources are by and large self-evidently inconsistent, though in this case there is a certain amount of running commentary.

Human rights: Religious freedoms in the People's Republic of China


15 February 2001
Human rights: Religious freedoms in the People's Republic of China B5-0106, 0116, 0124, 0142 and 0145/2001
European Parliament resoluton on freedom of religion in the People's Republic of China
The European Parliament,

¬ having regard to its previous resolutions on the human rights situation in China, on Tibet and on the Union's priorities and recommendations for the March 2001 session of the UN Human Rights Commission in Geneva,

¬ having regard to the conclusions of the EU-PRC summit meeting of 21 December 1999 and the Council conclusions of 22 January 2001 on the EU-PRC dialogue on human rights,

¬ having regard to Article 18 on freedom of religion of the United Nations¹ Universal Declaration of Human Rights,

A. whereas, in its report (COM(2000)552 final) on the implementation of the communication ŒBuilding a comprehensive partnership with China¹, the Commission notes that the situation in China has regressed in terms of respect for civil, political and religious rights, a finding which is endorsed in the conclusions of the General Affairs Council of 22 January 2001,

B. whereas, ever since making it compulsory for places of worship to be registered in 1994, the authorities of the PRC have been unceasing in their efforts to further limit the exercise of the freedom of religion,

C. whereas State control over religion is already evident in the restricted number of religions that are officially recognised, and whereas any religious activity that has not been registered by the official associations is regarded as illegal,

D. whereas, although the zeal with which the policy of repressing religious activity is enforced varies depending on the attitude of the local governments, in the supposedly autonomous Region of Tibet that policy is pursued systematically and implacably,
E. whereas the religious, cultural and national heritage of the Tibetan people is threatened with extinction,

F. whereas the Falun Gong organisation was officially declared illegal in China on 22 July 1999, an arrest warrant was issued for its founder, Li Hung-Zhi on 29 July, and in the last two years, according to reports, some 50 000 members of the Falun Gong movement have been arrested, of whom almost 25 000 are now in prison, have been sent to forced labour camp or have been forcibly committed to mental hospitals, while to date 137 of them have died after being ill-treated or tortured in the course of their arrest or detention,

G. noting that since 1989, when the Vatican set up its own Bishops¹ Conference, tensions between the authorities in Beijing and the non-official Catholic Church have increased significantly and many prominent members of the clergy of the non-official Catholic Church are still in prison, or have had restrictions placed on their freedom of movement, as a result of their refusal to support the official Church,

H. drawing attention to the policy of expulsion and systematic arrest of foreign Protestant priests and the harassment to which members of unregistered Protestant churches are subjected by the administrative authorities,

I. condemning the destruction of mosques and the arrest of persons who have taught the Koran without having received prior authorisation from the authorities,

1. Calls on China to release all those detained or imprisoned for peacefully exercising their internationally recognised rights to freedom of belief, religion and conscience;

2. Calls for the constitutional right to freedom of religion and belief to be fully guaranteed, together with the exercise of the associated rights of freedom of conscience, freedom of expression, freedom of association and freedom of assembly;

3. Regrets that, after having signed the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the PRC has still not finalised the ratification and implementation processes;

4. Reiterates its condemnation of the continued and severe violation of human rights in Tibet and the ongoing discrimination practised against the Tibetan people by the PRC authorities on the basis of race or ethnic origin or religious, cultural or political beliefs;

5. Invites the PRC government to allow Falun Gong practitioners to practise their fundamental right to freedom of conscience, expression, association and assembly in accordance with the PRC constitution;

6. Calls for the European Union and its Member States to submit a resolution to the United Nations¹ Commission on Human Rights at its meeting in Geneva to condemn all violations of religious rights and, in particular, those directed against Tibetan and Mongolian monks, certain Christian churches and certain Muslim communities and adherents of the Falun Gong movement;

7. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Council, the Commission, the parliaments of the Member States, the Office of the UNHC for Human Rights and the PRC Government and Parliament.


Resolution on Tibet by Sami Parliament


30th September 2000

The Saami Conference, representing Saami organisations in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia, at its 17th meeting in Kiruna, Sweden:

1. In the strongest possible way, condemns the ongoing Chinese occupation of Tibet. This year it is 50 years since the Chinese army attacked Tibetan territory, and made independant Tibet an occupied country;

2. Expresses grave concern regarding the reports on serious violations of the Tibetan people's fundamental human rights, and the increasing restrictions on their exercize of cultural and religious freedom;

3. Gives strong support to the Tibetan people and their non-violent fight for freedom;

4. Expresses its deep concern for the survival of the Tibetan people and their distinct culture, identity and civilization;

5. Requests the governments of Finland, Norway, Russia and Sweden to encourage the Chinese authorities to enter into a dialogue and negotiations with His Holiness the Dalai Lama, with the aim to end the occupation of Tibet; end the Chinese population transfer policy, which threatens the very survival of the Tibetan people; respect fundamental rights and freedoms of the Tibetan people; start the demilitarisation of Tibet; protect the natural environment of Tibet.


United States Congress - May 27, 1993

103d Congress
1st Session
H. Con. Res. 106

Mr. Ackerman (for himself, Mr. Gilman, Mr. Porter, and Mr. Lantos)

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION Urging the President to raise, at the highest levels of the Government of the People`s Republic of China, the issue of Chinese population transfer into Tibet in an effort to bring about an immediate end to that government`s policy on this issue.

Whereas the most critical issue for the Tibetan people today is the transfer of Chinese population into Tibet, which is reducing the Tibetans to a minority in their own country;
Whereas this population transfer is a combination of the direct transfer of Chinese by the Government of the People`s Republic of China and government-induced relocation;

Whereas the rate of population transfer has now reached the point where the distinct identity of the Tibetan people and their civilization are being overwhelmed;


Whereas the transfer of Chinese population into Tibet threatens the cultural, religious, and national identity of the Tibetan people and violates their human rights;

Whereas the State Department`s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 1992 states that the `massive influx into Tibet of Han Chinese. . .already affects ethnic mixture in Lhasa`, and in 1992 Asia Watch stated that the movement of Chinese into Tibet `has increased in recent years. . .because of incentives directly offered by the government`;

Whereas Tibetans have already been reduced to a minority of the population in all major Tibetan towns and cities;

Whereas new Chinese towns and cities, exclusively inhabited by Chinese settlers, are being built at an increasing rate;

Whereas Chinese population transfer results in widespread discrimination against Tibetans and in marginalization of Tibetans in political and economic spheres;

Whereas the Government of the People`s Republic of China sends Chinese settlers to Tibet and induces Chinese to relocate in Tibet by offering incentives such as wage, pension, and tax benefits, interest-free or low-interest loans, housing assistance, and assured employment for family members who move to Tibet;

Whereas on October 28, 1991, the Congress enacted section 355 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993, which expresses the sense of the Congress that Tibet is an illegally occupied country whose true representatives are the
Tibetan government in exile and His Holiness the Dalai Lama;

Whereas His Holiness the Dalai Lama`s efforts to achieve a peaceful negotiated solution to the problem of the transfer of Chinese into Tibet have not been reciprocated by the Government of the People`s Republic of China: Now, therefore, be it Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That the Congress urges the President to raise, at the highest levels of the Government of the People`s Republic of China, the issue of Chinese population transfer into Tibet in an effort to bring about an immediate end to that government`s policy on this issue.

107th CONGRESS

1st Session
S. 852

To support the aspirations of the Tibetan people to safeguard their distinct identity.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

May 9, 2001
Mrs. FEINSTEIN (for herself, Mr. THOMAS, Mr. LEAHY, Mr. JEFFORDS, Mr. LIEBERMAN, Mr. LEVIN, Mr. WELLSTONE, Mrs. BOXER, Mr. AKAKA, Mr. FEINGOLD, Mr. KENNEDY, Mrs. MURRAY, and Mr. TORRICELLI) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations

A BILL

To support the aspirations of the Tibetan people to safeguard their distinct identity.
Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as `Tibetan Policy Act of 2001'.

SEC. 2. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE.

The purpose of this Act is to support the aspirations of the Tibetan people to safeguard their distinct identity.

SEC. 3. FINDINGS.

Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The People's Republic of China has failed to respond to efforts by the United States and others to initiate a dialogue between the Chinese leadership and the Dalai Lama or his representatives leading to a mutually beneficial negotiated solution with respect to Tibet.

(2) Tibet has maintained throughout its history a national identity distinct from that of China.

(3) On October 1, 1949, the People's Republic of China was formally proclaimed in Beijing and the following year launched an armed invasion of Tibet.

(4) Under the 1951 Seventeen Point Agreement negotiated between the People's Republic of China and representatives of the Tibetan Government, which incorporated Tibet into China, China guaranteed no alteration of Tibetan political, cultural, and religious systems and institutions.

(5) The failure of the People's Republic of China to adhere to or uphold the Seventeen Point Agreement, and the imposition of so-called democratic reform, led to the March 1959 uprising in Lhasa and the Dalai Lama's repudiation of the Seventeen Point Agreement and flight to exile.

(6) Since the revolt against Chinese rule in Tibet that began in 1956 and through the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976, an estimated 1,200,000 Tibetans were killed and more than 6,000 religious sites were destroyed.

(7) In 1959, 1960, 1964, and 1997 the International Commission of Jurists examined Chinese policy in Tibet, violations of human rights in Tibet, and the position of Tibet in international law.

(8) The International Commission of Jurists found that the People's Republic of China had committed `acts of genocide . . . in Tibet in an attempt to destroy the Tibetans as a religious group' and that Tibet was at least `a de facto state' prior to 1951.

(9) The United Nations General Assembly adopted resolutions in 1959, 1961, and 1965 calling on the People's Republic of China to ensure respect for fundamental human rights of the Tibetan people and for their distinctive cultural and religious life, and to cease practices which deprive the Tibetan people of their fundamental rights and freedoms, including the right to self-determination.

(10) The 2000 Department of State Country Report on Human Rights Practices finds that `Chinese government authorities continued to commit numerous serious human rights abuses in Tibet, including instances of torture, arbitrary arrest, detention without public trial, and lengthy detention of Tibetan nationalists for peacefully expressing their political or religious views, and tight controls on religion and on other fundamental freedoms continued and intensified during the year'.

(11) Human rights, religious freedom, and the preservation of Tibet's distinct religious, cultural, and linguistic identity are legitimate interests of the international community.

(12) It is the policy of the United States to promote the elimination of all forms of racial, religious, and linguistic discrimination against the Tibetan people.

(13) Voice of America and Radio Free Asia Tibetan language broadcast programs provide information to the Tibetan people withheld from them by the Government of the People's Republic of China and, thus, a critical service in protecting the distinct Tibetan identity and promoting freedoms in Tibet.

(14) The Government of the People's Republic of China, through direct and indirect incentives, has encouraged an overwhelming number of Chinese to resettle in Tibet.

(15) The Government of the People's Republic of China has excluded Tibetans from participation in important policy decisions and meaningful participation in the governance of Tibet, and has failed to abide by its guarantees of autonomy for Tibet.

(16) The Guidelines for International Development Projects and Sustainable Investment in Tibet issued by the Central Tibetan Administration of His Holiness the Dalai Lama establish a sound basis for fostering responsible development and economic activity in Tibet.

(17) As a result of the failure of the Government of the People's Republic of China to grant genuine autonomy for Tibet and the preference it has shown in its economic and human infrastructure development efforts for Chinese in Tibet, Tibetans continue to remain plagued by poverty, illiteracy, poor nutrition, and their prosperity is further hindered by a limited infrastructure and communications network that provides them only a marginal benefit.

(18) The People's Republic of China has ratified the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights and is thereby bound by its provisions and to international monitoring of its human rights practices, and China has signed the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, and Article One of each covenant states that all peoples have the right of self-determination.

(19) President Jiang Zemin, in a press conference with President Clinton on June 27, 1997, and similarly on other occasions, has stated that if the Dalai Lama `recognizes that Tibet is an inseparable part of China, then the door to negotiations is open'.

(20) The Dalai Lama has specifically stated that he is not seeking independence and is committed to finding a negotiated solution within the framework enunciated by Deng Xiaoping in 1979, and in his statement on the `41st Anniversary of the Tibetan National Uprising', and similarly on other occasions, has said that `it has been my consistent endeavor to find a peaceful and mutually acceptable solution to the Tibetan problem . . . [m]y approach envisages that Tibet enjoy genuine autonomy within the framework of the People's Republic of China . . . [s]uch a mutually beneficial solution would contribute to the stability and unity of China, their two most important priorities, while at the same time the Tibetans would be ensured of their basic right to preserve their own [c]ivilization and to protect the delicate environment of the Tibetan plateau'.

SEC. 4. DECLARATIONS OF POLICY.

Congress--

(1) as stated in section 355 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138), reaffirms that Tibet including those Tibetan areas incorporated into the Chinese provinces of Sichuan, Yunnan, Gansu, and Qinghai is an occupied country under the established principles of international law;

(2) commends the Republic of India for providing asylum and ongoing humanitarian care to the Dalai Lama and Tibetans and exile and assuming the financial burden of such care on the resources of India; and

(3) commends the Kingdom of Nepal for shelter and hospitality provided to Tibetans in exile;
(4) expresses concern over incidents of ill treatment of transitory Tibetans in border areas; and

(5) urges continued cooperation with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Kathmandu.

SEC. 5. TIBET NEGOTIATIONS.

(a) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that--

(1) the President and Secretary of State should initiate steps to encourage the Government of the People's Republic of China to enter into a dialogue with the Dalai Lama or his representatives leading to a negotiated agreement on Tibet; and

(2) after such an agreement is reached, the President and Secretary of State should work to ensure compliance with the agreement.

(b) PERIODIC REPORT- Not later than six months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and not later than the end of every six-month period thereafter (until such a time as an agreement described in subsection

(a)(1) is reached which is satisfactory to both the Chinese and Tibetan peoples), the President shall transmit to the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report on (1) the steps initiated by the President and Secretary of State in accordance with subsection

(a)(1), and (2) the status of any discussions between the People's Republic of China and the Dalai Lama or his representatives.
SEC. 6. REPORTING ON TIBET.

In accordance with section 536(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236), whenever a report is transmitted to the Congress on a country-by-country basis there shall be included in such report, where applicable, a separate section on Tibet. The reports referred to in the preceding sentence include reports transmitted under sections 116(d) and 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to human rights).

SEC. 7. UNITED STATES SPECIAL COORDINATOR FOR TIBETAN ISSUES.

(a) UNITED STATES SPECIAL COORDINATOR FOR TIBETAN ISSUES- There shall be within the Department of State a United States Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues.

(b) CONSULTATION- The Secretary of State shall consult with the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives prior to the designation of the Special Coordinator.

(c) CENTRAL OBJECTIVE- The central objective of the Special Coordinator is to promote substantive dialogue between the Government of the People's Republic of China and the Dalai Lama or his representatives.

(d) DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES- The Special Coordinator shall--

(1) coordinate United States Government policies, programs, and projects concerning Tibet;

(2) vigorously promote the policy of seeking to protect the distinct historical, religious, cultural, and linguistic identity of Tibet, and seeking improved respect for human rights;

(3) maintain close contact with religious, cultural, and political leaders of the Tibetan people, including regular travel to Tibetan areas of the People's Republic of China, and to Tibetan refugee settlements in India and Nepal;

(4) consult with Congress on policies relevant to Tibet and the future and welfare of the Tibetan people;

(5) make efforts to establish contacts in the foreign ministries of other countries to pursue a negotiated solution for Tibet; and

(6) have adequate resources, staff, and administrative support for the mission.
SEC. 8. CONGRESSIONAL-EXECUTIVE COMMISSION ON THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA.

Section 302(h) of the U.S.-China Relations Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-286), relating to the Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China, is amended--

(1) by striking `shall include specific information' and inserting the following: `shall include--
`(1) specific information'; and
(2) by striking the period at the end and inserting `; and'; and
(3) by adding at the end the following:

`(2) a description of the status of negotiations between the Government of the People's Republic of China and the Dalai Lama or his representatives, and measures taken to safeguard Tibet's distinct historical, religious, cultural, and linguistic identity and the protection of human rights.'.

SEC. 9. TIBETAN REFUGEES.
(a) MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for migration and refugee assistance programs for fiscal years 2002, 2003, and 2004, $2,000,000 for each such fiscal year is authorized to be available only for humanitarian assistance for Tibetan refugees.

(b) EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for educational and cultural exchange programs for fiscal years 2002, 2003, and 2004--

(1) $500,000 for each such fiscal year is authorized to be available only for the Ngawang Choephel Tibetan scholarship program for Tibetans in exile; and

(2) $250,000 for each such fiscal year is authorized to be available only for assistance to nongovernmental organizations, such as the National Endowment for Democracy, for the purpose of providing training and education in democracy activities for Tibetans and monitoring the human rights situation in Tibet.

SEC. 10. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ON THE TIBETAN PLATEAU.

(a) DECLARATIONS OF POLICY- It is the policy of the United States to encourage and use the voice and vote of the United States to support projects proposed to be funded or otherwise supported by international financial institutions, other international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations in Tibet that are designed to raise the standard of living for the Tibetan people and assist Tibetans to become self-sufficient, if the projects meet the principles contained in subsection (d).

(b) INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS- The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States executive director of each international financial institution to encourage and use the voice and vote of the United States to support projects in Tibet proposed to be funded or otherwise supported by such international financial institutions, if the projects are consistent with the principles contained in subsection (d).

(c) EXPORT-IMPORT BANK, OPIC, AND TDA- The President shall direct the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, and the Trade and Development Agency to support projects proposed to be funded or otherwise supported by such entities in Tibet, if the projects are consistent with the principles contained in subsection (d).

(d) TIBET PRINCIPLES- Projects in Tibet supported by international financial institutions, other international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the United States entities referred to in subsection (c), should--

(1) be implemented only after conducting a thorough needs-assessment of the Tibetan people through field visits and interviews;
(2) be preceded by cultural and environmental impact assessments;
(3) foster self-sufficiency and self-reliance of Tibetans;
(4) promote accountability of the development agencies to the Tibetan people and active participation of Tibetans in all project stages;
(5) respect Tibetan culture, traditions, and the Tibetan knowledge and wisdom about their landscape and survival techniques;
(6) be subject to monitoring by the development agencies at all stages of the project by a local presence to ensure that the intended target group benefits;
(7) be implemented by development agencies prepared to use Tibetan as the working language of the projects;
(8) neither provide incentive for, nor facilitate the migration and settlement of, non-Tibetans into Tibet; and
(9) neither provide incentive for, nor facilitate the transfer of ownership of, Tibetan land and natural resources to non-Tibetans.

SEC. 11. UNITED STATES-EUROPEAN INTERPARLIAMENTARIAN GROUP.
It is the sense of Congress that the United States and European parliamentarians participating in the United States-European Interparliamentary Group should focus on issues related to advancing the dialogue between
the leadership of the People's Republic of China and the Dalai Lama or his representatives in addition to their normal responsibilities.

SEC. 12. RELEASE OF PRISONERS AND ACCESS TO PRISONS.
It is the sense of Congress that the President and Secretary of State, in meetings with representatives of the Government of the People's Republic of China, should--
(1) request the immediate and unconditional release of all those held prisoner for expressing their political or religious views in Tibet;
(2) seek access for international humanitarian organizations to prisoners in Tibet to ensure that prisoners are not being mistreated and are receiving necessary medical care; and
(3) seek the immediate medical parole of Ngawang Choephel and other Tibetan prisoners known to be in serious ill health.

SEC. 13. ESTABLISHMENT OF A UNITED STATES BRANCH OFFICE IN LHASA, TIBET.
The Secretary of State shall make best efforts to establish an office in Lhasa, Tibet, to monitor political, economic, and cultural developments in Tibet.

SEC. 14. SENSE OF CONGRESS.
It is the sense of Congress that the United States will seek ways to support economic development, cultural preservation, health care, and education and environmental sustainability for Tibetans inside Tibet.

SEC. 15. REQUIREMENT FOR TIBETAN LANGUAGE TRAINING.
The Secretary of State shall ensure that Tibetan language training is available to foreign service officers, and that every effort is made to ensure that a Tibetan-speaking foreign service officer is assigned to a consulate in the People's Republic of China responsible for tracking developments in Tibet.

SEC. 16. TIBET CONSIDERATIONS AT THE UNITED NATIONS.
It is the sense of Congress that--
(1) the United States Government should oppose any efforts to prevent consideration of issues related to Tibet in any body of the United Nations;
(2) the United States Government should oppose any efforts to prevent the participation of the Dalai Lama or any representative of the Dalai Lama in nongovernmental fora hosted by or otherwise organized under the auspices of any body of the United Nations; and
(3) the Secretary of State should instruct the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to support the appointment of a special rapporteur or working group for Tibet for the purposes of monitoring human rights violations in Tibet, and for making reports available to the High Commissioner for Refugees, High Commissioner for Human Rights, Human Rights Commission, General Assembly, and other United Nations bodies.

SEC. 17. RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN TIBET.
(a) HIGH-LEVEL CONTACTS- Pursuant to section 105 of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998, the United States Ambassador to the People's Republic of China--
(1) shall seek to meet with the 11th Panchen Lama, who was taken from his home on May 17, 1995, and otherwise ascertain information concerning his whereabouts and well-being; and
(2) shall request the Government of the People's Republic of China that the 11th Panchen Lama be released and allowed to pursue his religious studies without interference and according to tradition.
(b) PROMOTION OF INCREASED ADVOCACY- Pursuant to section 108(a) of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998, it is the sense of Congress that representatives of the United States Government in exchanges with officials of the Government of the People's Republic of China should call for and otherwise promote the cessation of all interference by the Government of the People's Republic of China or Communist Party in the religious affairs of the Tibetan people.


So dear 123,

If you still think all these are untrue and the communist rubbish propaganda you have digested is fact then I have no word or logic to explain to you. Great master Sakyapa exclaimed once that he was not afraid to debate a hundred masters but he would not argue with a single fool.

If you want to read more, there are more to read. I can paste them for you if your govt. does not allow you to read what you want.
123  

Location: US
Subject: Ignorance
Nov 26 2005 04:36 AM

Dear Bhod:

I don't know why you, as a self-proclaimed avid reader, never heard of American Diplomat as well as Tibetologist, William Rockhill.

And also I don't know why you, don't know that Xinjiang had never been a part of Ottoman Empire.

And I also don't know why you, don't know that Beijing do not appoint over half of HK's legislators.

I also don't know why you, don't know that the entire international community has never recognized Tibet as an independent sovereign country.

You ask me why you don't know these stuffs, so to whom should I ask?

Since you don't know these quite common knowledge, I don't think we can continue further meaningful discourse.

So be it.
Bhod Rangzen  

Location: Delhi
Subject: Hu, Hou & Wen or Who, How & When
Nov 25 2005 08:19 AM

Dear Mr. 123,

Pardon me but it is not me who said, 'Why are you so stubborn to refuse to listen to his opinion about Tibet' when it came to Mr. Rockhill'? Not me I am sure. And if this bloke was such a reputed history, how come I have never heard of him. I am by all means nothing less than a very avid reader when it comes to book.

But still I stand by my previous statement that many thing the westerners wrote in those ages were based on their own limited, narrow and at times evangelist or western point of view failing to appreciate the nature of things as they were in Tibet in those times. Haven't you heard that the British Delegation that came to Tibet thought they were very welcomed when they saw people clapping whereas in Tibetan custom clapping is meant to ward of evil.

Entire international community does not recognize china is a blatant lie in face of bills passed by European Union and UN. You should have followed those links I sent you. But I think since you are in China, you cannot access those pages. Probably you have been blocked by you commie govt.

As for Heinrich Harrer, you should read his book. Then you will know what type of person he was. Any way the present day Germany is a nation which recognizes its mistakes and makes positive moves to repent and make up for past mistakes. What about China, it still proudly flaunts its evil past and implements more repression against its own people and people it has conquered.

To err and repent is human. To err and be proud of it is evil. Did you know how many times the Pope met Dalai Lama, How many times Bush met Dalai Lama? How many world leaders have met Dalai Lama? How many cities in Europe have flag on Tibet along with other nations?

It is true that due to economic blackmail as well as greed, many countries today diplomatically do not support the Tibetan cause. but the population in these country know about Tibet and support Tibetan cause. How many people turn up to greet and welcome Dalai Lama wherever he goes? How many times your govt. has been snubbed although you tried your best to stop his visits?

The only people who turn up to greet your leaders are paid cronies and protesters. I have seen your president and prime minister ashamed to enter from the front door of offices and events and enter from the back door like a thief and a criminal.

As for war criminals, although your commie leaders are no better if not worse than Hitler, we, Tibetans being Buddhists will extend our compassion to them rather than vengeance. If we take the path of violence, you Chinese will pee in your pants, but being Buddhist, it is nor a right thing to do.

But only time will teach you commies. You will reap what you sow. Law of Karma is immutable. Just wait and see. If Mao could talk to you from the hell he is in, he may as well warn you leaders Hu & Wen (Who & When).

Who (Hu) is the Chinese President?

When (Wen) is the Chinese Prime Minister?


HAHAHAHAHAHA


How?

Who is How (Hou)?

HAHAHAHAHAH

See now you commies are out to get Bhutan. Do you also have some report or fake historical record to support his.?
China's mao's veneral bug  

Location: how's that
Subject: let's start bickering
Nov 25 2005 05:54 AM

First Dalai is not a word that stands on it's own. it is Dalai Lama. And yes, you are right. Dalai Lama is a pacifist and may want only autonomy. But not all of us are that...besides we are not naive.

And If Tibetan opnion means Squat to the Chinese..whatever that means.soudns no good anyway...then all the more reasons for tibetans to kick the chinese out of tibet. Or make their life in tibet miserable... boycotting their businesses, not being friendly to them etc...doing everything possible to get them OUT>
DaLaid Lama  

Location: Shangrila
Subject: what's the fuss?!
Nov 25 2005 05:17 AM


Dalai claims he's not seeking independence; folks here are seeking independence.

So what? does it matter? does it change anything.

No. Your opinion means squat to china.
123  

Location: US
Subject: Facts
Nov 25 2005 02:06 AM

Dear Tingmo:

May I remind you that the entire international community does not recognize Tibet as a part of China from Today.

When China was in the ROC period when the warlords of each province fighting against each other (inclduing the battle between the Sichuan warlord and 13th HHDL warlord), the world already recognized Tibet as a part of China.

When China was at the brink of extinction under Japanese aggression while you guys entertained Japanese ally Nazi Gestapo Heinrich Harrer, the world stll recognized Tibet as a part of China.

When the crazy Mao turned every country into China's enemy during the Cultural Revolution, the whole world still recognized Tibet as a part of China.

Now even the 25 countries, including Vatican, which recognize ROC on Taiwan but do not recognize PRC, still don't recognize Dharamsala.

Look at PLO which started the movemnt with you guys at almost the same time, has already gain recognition from almost every country.

Gee.
Cornered Tingmo  

Location: us
Subject: whose facts and whose oppinions to swallow
Nov 24 2005 10:45 PM

123
At the moment, the entire international community is enamoured with trade with china so they may not recognize our countries. But they will wake up soon. Don't worry. We will be there to remind them every day. And Tibet, and Mongolia, and Turkestan will become free one day because we will live on...(And Manchurians too if they are not completely sinosized by now and if they want their own land back) and if we are not able to live inside our own countries...outside them. But don't imagine for one moment that you will be able to steal these countries so blatantly foreve3r.
We understand your romance with materialism. If we don't get what belongs to us..well then, some of us are not such devout Buddhists, so we won't mind sending the whole thing to ashang choegyal (that is Lord Yama)
As you have such anger towards the Japanese for what they had done to you hundred or so years ago, so should you understand the pain and anger we feel against you Chinese for this "blatant robbing" of our country.

123  

Location: US
Subject: Facts not opinions
Nov 24 2005 04:32 PM

Dear Bhod:

It is funny that first you doubt if the American diplomat Rockhill ever went into Tibet and knew Tibetan language. Now when you were notified that he even met the 13th HHDL, you said that his words are just "opinions" and not "facts".

Okay. You guys don't want opinions. But why do pro-Tibet websites, including TGIE's, keep posting opinions from Melvyn Goldstein's and NGO's like that of International Commission of Jurists??

Since you want FACTs, then let me reiterate here: The entire international community never recognize Tibet or so called Turkestan as an independent country.

Tibet and Turkestan are just geographical terms. Of course, you guys can dream on the fantasy of nation building.

But China is not the China 150 years ago that allows opium dumping or land stealing.

if anybody dares doing injustice to the Chinese nation by stealing her sacred territory, what happened in the Tokyo War Crime Tribunal would be these criminals' fate.

Why were the 14 Class A war criminals hanged to death? Two of them--Hirota and Ishihar--were convicted on charge in instigating war to set up Manchukuo.

1C2S will fail? c'mon. If you have a crystal ball to tell the future, you'd better tell me when you will go back to Tibet!
Page : [1] 2 3 4 5 5
Advertisement
 Latest Topics
LODI GYARI - A LEGENDARY DIPLOMAT - OBITUARY (17:11, 17 Nov 2018)
Govt. of India’s post of advisor for Tibet likely to remain vacant until Xi's 2019 visit (13:11, 16 Nov 2018)
Twitter CEO meets Dalai Lama, calls him “an amazing teacher” (00:11, 15 Nov 2018)
UN says it must respect the “sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity” of China (20:11, 13 Nov 2018)
Nepal applauds China at UPR for its work in Tibet (20:11, 13 Nov 2018)
  Hot Topics
Kiwi - Tibetan teen withdrawn to play football in China after visa delay (0)
“Fake Panchen” elected leader of Buddhist Association in Tibet (0)
How free speech got trampled upon in Sonam Ling settlement (0)
Bhutan moves to decriminalize homosexuality (0)
Tibetan exile capital discusses upcoming Tiananmen Massacre's 30th anniversary (0)
No amount of Tiananmen censorship can conceal the facts: Ai Weiwei (0)
PM Modi snubs Tibetan leadership for swearing-in ceremony (0)
Beijing reiterates reluctance to hold dialogue (0)
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Phayul.com does not endorse the advertisements placed on the site. It does not have any control over the google ads. Please send the URL of the ads if found objectionable to editor@phayul.com
Copyright © 2004-2019 Phayul.com   feedback | advertise | contact us
Powered by Lateng Online