Hi guest, Register | Login | Contact Us
Welcome to Phayul.com - Our News Your Views
Fri 15, Dec 2017 08:04 AM (IST)
Search:     powered by Google
 MENU
Home
News
Photo News
Opinions
Statements &
Press Releases

Book Reviews
Movie Reviews
Interviews
Travels
Health
Obituaries
News Discussions
News Archives
Download photos from Tibet
 Latest Stories
China approves 60 ‘living Buddhas’ to counter Dalai Lama’s influence
Court finds Prague police’s removal of Tibetan flag unlawful
Tibetan Nomads banned from UNESCO site nature reserve by China
FIFA kicks off football development campaign for women in Tibet
I may have devolved political power but will never forget Tibet: Dalai Lama
Lithuanian parliamentarians set up a solidarity group for Tibet
Nine SFT activists arrested for protesting Chinese FM Wang Yi in Delhi
Dalai Lama arrives in Mundgod, visits Drepung Monastery
Tibetans hold mass solidarity rally on on Worlds Human rights day in New York
Tibetan Youth Congress condemn Chinese Foreign Minister's visit to India
 Latest Photo News
His Holiness the Dalai Lama looks at a picture of his former home, the Potala palace, in Drepung Monastery, Dec 14, 2017, Phayul Photo/Geleck Palsang
Tibetans participate in a candle light vigil to mourn the passing away of Chinese activist Liu Xiaobo in China, TCV Day School, July 14, 2017 Phayul Photo: Kunsang Gashon
His Holiness the Dalai Lama leaves for Gaggal airport, June 11, 2017. The Tibetan leader is scheduled to give a public talk on "Embracing the Beauty of Diversity in our World" at the University of California San Diego on June 16, 2017. Phayul Photo: Kunsang Gashon
more photos »
Advertisement
Tsering Wangmo Dhompa's 'A Home in Tibet' by Thubten Samphel
HT[Monday, September 29, 2014 10:59]
By Thubten Samphel

A Home in Tibet
Author:Tsering Wangmo Dhompa,
Penguin Viking, Price: Rs 499, PP: 306

In Thubron’s case, his mother died in a hospital ward, perhaps of natural causes. But this sets him off into meditation and on a journey to Mount Kailash, the Precious Mountain, in western Tibet. As Thubron explains, “You cannot walk out your grief, I know, or absolve yourself of your survival, or bring anyone back… Then you go on a journey (it’s my profession, after all), walking to a place beyond your own history, to the sound of the river flowing the other way. In the end you come to rest at a mountain that is holy to others.”

In Dhompa’s case, her journey to Tibet was triggered by the death of her mother in a tragic road accident in the growling and choking traffic of north India in the early 1990s. Dhompa recounts the tragedy. “A man emptying his bowels in a field witnessed the collision on the highway. A truck is a powerful beast, he would comment later to a police officer. He saw a jeep spin like a dizzy house sparrow. The man’s peaceful morning ritual had been shattered by the intrusion of death.”

Dhompa’s haunting A Home in Tibet is an intensely personal journey to Tibet to discover her late mother’s homeland and the roots of the author’s identity. It is a journey to redeem, remember and reclaim her mother’s memory. At the heart of Dhompa’s memoir and her journey to the Land of Snows is the love of Tibet bequeathed to the daughter by her mother. While alive, the author’s mother had waited years to end her suffering. “She gave her suffering one name: exile” Her mother had been long gone but her memories of Tibet stayed with the daughter. This prompted the author to make her own way to Tibet’s wild east, a land of brigands and swagger, of immense personal courage, unending tribal feuds and fine horsemanship or, these days, of bikemanship. It is a journey to find herself by reliving her mother’s memories through connecting with her remaining family members, her homeland’s landscape, the mountains, rivers and lakes and the gods and spirits who reside in them. By doing this, the author hopes to experience Tibet as lived by her mother.

As Dhompa says, “We travel with ease as fresh snow crackles under the vehicle. The mountains surround us so that I feel I am carried within them. I am watched over by the deities of the land. I tell myself a story so I remember. A long time ago, the mountain deities of Tibet and the mountain deities of China went to war…

Buddhist monks riding motorcycle decorated with katoks and prayer flags in Kham, East Tibet. Getty Images
Buddhist monks riding motorcycle decorated with katoks and prayer flags in Kham, East Tibet. Getty Images
“And because beautiful daydreams are made of mountains, home and freedom, I dream a different ending. “Lha Gyalo. May the gods be victorious.” A Home in Tibet is the first book written by a Tibetan woman born and educated in exile. With this book, Dhompa joins the ranks of Rinchen Lhamo of We Tibetans, Rinchen Dolma Taring of A Daughter of Tibet and Jetsun Pema of Tibet: My Story, all towering women who have told their personal stories and in doing so told Tibet’s story to the world. Rinchen Lhamo, Rinchen Taring and Jetsun Pema were born in the cultural and social milieu of old Tibet and the last two witnessed the upheaval caused by the Chinese presence in Tibet.

Their books are with us to explain that great disruption and what was disrupted. Dhompa’s is to learn and discover the old Tibet and explain the new. And she does it with a sensitivity and keen observation that enlivens and sustains her considerable narrative skill. Thubten Samphel is the director of the Tibet Policy Institute and author of Falling Through the Roof, a work of fiction.



The author is the director of the Tibet Policy Institute and author of Falling Through the Roof, a work of fiction.


The views expressed in this piece are that of the author and the publication of the piece on this website does not necessarily reflect their endorsement by the website.
Print Send Bookmark and Share
  Readers' Comments »
Be the first to comment on this article

 More..
Voice of sanity: Why the Tibetan cause is a deeper search for self
In Tibet, China Moves from Empire-lite to Empire-heavy: book review by Thubten Samphel
Tsering Wangmo Dhompa's 'A Home in Tibet' by Thubten Samphel
Don’t block the tap
‘I Will Carry the Sky’ By Bhuchung D. Sonam
Tibetan Rage on My Page: Seeking Refuge in Stories: Thubten Samphel reviews The Tibetan Suitcase
Permanent Address? Stolen!
A Review of BUTTERFLY’S WINGS, Tenzing Rigdol’s 3rd Collection of Poetry
Shakabpa and the awakening of Tibetan history by Jamyang Norbu
Battles Lost and Won Between Tibet and China
Advertisement
Advertisement
Photo Galleries
Advertisement
Phayul.com does not endorse the advertisements placed on the site. It does not have any control over the google ads. Please send the URL of the ads if found objectionable to editor@phayul.com
Copyright © 2004-2017 Phayul.com   feedback | advertise | contact us
Powered by Lateng Online
Advertisement