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His Holiness the Dalai Lama is being escorted to the teaching site at Tsuglakhang temple, May 13, 2019. Phayul Photo: Kunsang Gashon
More than a thousand Tibetans, Uyghurs and supporters protest in Paris to denounce China's repression in Tibet. Xi Jinping will be on an official visit to France from Monday. Under a canopy of flags with snow lions, protesters marched from the Trocadero Human Rights Square to the Peace Wall at the other end of the Champ de Mars. 25 March 2019. Phayul photo/Norbu Wangyal
His Holiness the Dalai Lama arrives at Theckchen Choeling temple on the second day of his teachings, McLeod Ganj, Feb. 20, 2019 Phayul Photo: Kunsang Gashon
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Statement of Maria Otero, Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs, U.S. Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues
Tibet.net[Friday, November 04, 2011 15:21]
Chairman Ros-Lehtinen, Ranking Member Berman, and esteemed members of the Committee, thank you for calling this hearing today on the Congressional-Executive Commission on China’s 2011 Annual Report.

I would like to congratulate Chairman Smith, Cochairman Brown and my fellow members of the Commission on an excellent report. I especially would like to recognize the Commission’s staff for their fine work, expertise and diligence. The work of the Commission, including its published reporting and its Political Prisoner
Database, is a tremendous resource, and I am honored to serve as a Commissioner. Political prisoners and human rights advocates cited in the 2011 annual report include rights defender Chen Guangcheng, lawyers Jiang Tianyong and Gao Zhisheng, Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo, journalist Memetjan Abdulla, bishop Su Zhimin, labor advocate Zhao Dongmin, Tibetan nomad Ronggyal Adrag, monk Choeying Khedrub, former monk Jigme Gyatso, and many others. Shining a light on human rights in China and particularly on conditions in Tibetan areas is always important, and certainly could not be more important than it is at the present time.

As U.S. Special Coordinator for Tibetan Issues, I would like to draw attention to a number of the Commission’s findings on Tibet.
Over the last year, Tibetans who peacefully expressed disagreement with government policy faced increased risk of punishment, as the Chinese government continued to criminalize such expression under the guise of “safeguarding social stability.” The Chinese government also substantially increased state infringement of
freedom of religion in Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and nunneries. Government security and judicial officials detained and imprisoned Tibetan writers, artists, intellectuals, and cultural advocates who lamented or criticized government policies.

In July, when I participated on the Commission’s panel, “The Dalai Lama: What He Means for Tibetans Today,” I noted my deep concern with the deteriorating human rights situation in Tibetan areas of China, and specifically with the abuse and forcible removal of monks from Kirti Monastery and the heavy security presence there.
The recent self-immolations of young Tibetans, many of whom have been affiliated with Kirti Monastery, are desperate acts that reflect intense frustration with human rights conditions, including religious freedom, inside China. The Commission has thoroughly documented the policies that many believe have created escalating
tensions and a growing sense of isolation and despair among Tibetans. These policies include dramatically expanded government controls on religious life and practice, ongoing “patriotic education” campaigns within monasteries that require monks to denounce the Dalai Lama, increasingly intensive surveillance, arbitrary detentions and disappearances of hundreds of monks, and restrictions on and imprisonment of some families and friends of self-immolators.

The U.S. government repeatedly has urged the Chinese government to address its counterproductive policies in Tibetan areas that have created tensions and that threaten the unique religious, cultural and linguistic identity of the Tibetan people. Senior State Department officials have consistently and directly raised with the Chinese government the issue of Tibetan self-immolations. We have urged the Chinese government to allow access to Tibetan areas for journalists, diplomats and other observers. We also have asked the Chinese government to resume substantive dialogue with the Dalai Lama or his representatives. When President Obama met with the Dalai Lama at the White House in July, the President stressed that he encourages direct dialogue to resolve long-standing differences and that a dialogue that produces results would be positive for China and Tibetans.

I have had the honor of meeting several times with the Dalai Lama, and I also have had the opportunity to speak with Tibetans who live in China, and in India and Nepal. The U.S. government believes that the Dalai Lama can be a constructive partner for China in dealing with the challenge of resolving continuing tensions in Tibetan areas. The Obama Administration hopes that Chinese leaders will pursue substantive dialogue to resolve remaining differences and provide all Chinese citizens with peace, prosperity, and genuine stability.
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Official Statement of the Tashi Lhunpo Monastery on the 26th Birthday of the 11th Panchen Lama
OFFICIAL STATEMENT OF THE TASHI LHUNPO MONASTERY ON 25TH BIRTHDAY OF PANCHEN LAMA
Letter to President Obama from Utah Tibetan Association
Statement of Tibetan Parliament on His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s 78th Birthday
The Statement of the Sikyong on the Auspicious Occasion of the Seventy-Eighth Birthday of His Holiness the Great Fourteenth Dalai Lama of Tibet
Statement on International Day in Support of Torture Victims: TCHRD
Preventing Cultural Genocide: The Case for Genuine Autonomy for Tibet
OFFICIAL STATEMENT OF THE TASHI LHUNPO MONASTERY ON THE 24TH BIRTHDAY OF HIS HOLINESS THE 11TH PANCHEN LAMA
Central and Regional Tibetan Women’s Association commemorate the 54th Anniversary of National Tibetan Women’s Uprising Day
The Statement of Sikyong Dr Lobsang Sangay on the 54th Anniversary of the Tibetan National Uprising Day
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