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His Holiness the Dalai Lama looks at a picture of his former home, the Potala palace, in Drepung Monastery, Dec 14, 2017, Phayul Photo/Geleck Palsang
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His Holiness the Dalai Lama leaves for Gaggal airport, June 11, 2017. The Tibetan leader is scheduled to give a public talk on "Embracing the Beauty of Diversity in our World" at the University of California San Diego on June 16, 2017. Phayul Photo: Kunsang Gashon
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Solving the mystery of the Tibetan Plateau
Phayul[Friday, November 04, 2005 22:30]
Edmonton, Alberta November 04, 2005 - A University of Alberta physicist who helped solve the mystery of how the Tibetan Plateau became so elevated is still uncovering information about the region.

Several years ago Dr. Martyn Unsworth and a team of scientists from China and the United States used low-frequency radio waves to discover the mid-crust of the plateau is like a big waterbed. The hot, molten rocks supporting the plateau are less dense than cold rocks, which means they slowly rise. That discovery provides an explanation for how the whole of Tibet might rise over millions and millions of years.

Unsworth has since learned that geological makeup is typical of the whole length of the Himalaya, not just a small region.

Dubbed the roof of the world, the plateau contains not just Mount Everest, but nearly all of Earth's territory higher than 13,125 feet. The area, formed when India rammed into Asia about 50 million years ago, is considered a showcase of plate tectonics.
Unsworth's latest findings appear in the current edition of the scientific journal Nature.
(UPI)

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Solving the mystery of the Tibetan Plateau
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